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Walter S. Weems of Brunini, Grantham, Grower & Hewes, PLLC, in Jackson has been named chairman of the board of trustees for Methodist Rehabilitation Center in Jackson.

At Brunini, Weems serves as principal outside counsel for both traditional corporations and a number of entrepreneurs. His practice areas include corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, and real estate. He was chairman of Brunini’s board of directors from 1999 to 2010.


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Doug Boone of Jackson has joined the staff of Methodist Rehabilitation Center in Jackson as vice president of business development and community relations. He is responsible for continuous development, improvement and promotion of MRC's brand and increasing the utilization of MRC's clinical services. He supports all MRC business lines, manages community relations, oversees strategic business development and develops customer loyalty.


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Jamecca Jones has enjoyed “making people look beautiful” since the days she fashioned ponytails and freeze curls for her Bailey High School classmates.

So when a gunshot wound put her in a wheelchair, the Jackson hairstylist was determined to keep the job she loves.

First, she balanced on stacked pillows to reach clients at Shades of Color in Jackson. But that rickety perch has now been replaced by the wizardry of a standing wheelchair.

With a push of a button, Jones can once again rise to her feet and let her fingers fly.


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Methodist Rehabilitation Center in Jackson has named its latest Employees of the Quarter.

Pat Green of Jackson was named Clinical Services Employee of the Quarter. She serves as a urology licensed practical nurse (LPN) for MRC’s radiology department.

Patricia Conerly of Brandon was named Support Services Employee of the Quarter. She serves as collector for MRC’s business office. 


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Beverly Brower of Jackson is one of nearly 9 million Americans affected by scoliosis, a condition that causes painful curvature of the spine. And in her early teens, her issues were severe enough to require surgery.

“I was pretty much problem free after that for a very long time,” said Brower, who is now 34. “But as I got older, I started to notice some changes and had more pain and just general discomfort.”


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Shelby Cissom of Dry Creek took her first ATV ride buckled into a baby seat on her father’s four-wheeler.

She ended her last strapped to a gurney and headed for a trauma center.

It’s a common fate in a state that ranks No. 15 in ATV-related deaths. And no one knows that better than staff at Methodist Rehabilitation Center in Jackson.


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More than two years after a paralyzing car wreck, Nikosha Anderson’s life was finally coming back together.

She had returned to college, her 5-year-old son was starting school and she was finishing rehab.

“Everything was falling into place,” the Jackson resident said.


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For over 15 years, Eric Kelly of Jackson has been living with lymphedema.

The chronic condition causes swelling in the arms or legs from lymphatic fluid buildup, and there is no cure. But it can be managed with proper care.

“It’s something that’s just never going to go away,” said Kelly, who has lymphedema in his legs. “It’s a steady process of learning to manage it. And I’m managing it much better now—I’m able to walk better, without pain.”


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Candidates want to end speeches with a bang instead of a whisper.

So speech pathologist Heather Wise of Madison tells the vote-getters to practice vocal hygiene.

The term describes habits that promote a strong and healthy voice. And the strategy could save the loud and long-winded from committing vocal abuse. 

“Many candidates use their voices in ways that cause strain,” said the therapist for Methodist Outpatient Neurological Rehabilitation in Flowood, a division of Methodist Rehabilitation Center in Jackson.


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Sheri Carter feels like a toy soldier as she swings her arms and takes giant steps through her Pearl neighborhood.

“It’s kind of funny looking,” said the 59-year-old. “I wait until dark. And I stop when a car comes by.”

But quitting the exercise is out of the question. It’s part of an innovative therapy that’s helping Carter keep her Parkinson’s disease symptoms at bay.


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